In My Attic by Lina Hansen


In My Attic – A Magical Misfits Mystery by Lina Hansen
Publisher: Self-Published
Genre: Suspense/Mystery, Paranormal, Contemporary
Length: Full Length (263 pages)
Rating: 4.5 Stars
Reviewed by Astilbe

Sometimes all it takes is murder to discover who you truly are.

Grammar school teacher Myrtle Coldron has no patience to spare for Aunt Eve’s Wiccan shenanigans. Myrtle ignores auntie’s frantic plea for help—only to learn she has crashed from the attic to her death. The circumstances are suspicious; murder is on the cards. Riddled with guilt, Myrtle returns to the Witch’s Retreat, Eve’s beloved Bed and Breakfast, to sleuth for the truth.

No such luck.

The sleepy, historic village sheltering the B+B also hides a mystery. Soon enough, Myrtle is besieged by a zany posse of suspects, nightly visitors in the attic, threatening notes—and a zombie primula with a mind of its own.

Somebody is out to get her, and it will take all her skills—including those she doesn’t care for—to keep Myrtle alive.

What were your ancestors doing generations ago? Are you sure that answer is the correct one?

Myrtle was a well rounded and likeable main character. I appreciated the fact that she wasn’t always confident in her decisions, whether they were small ones like what to eat while trying to trim up or big ones like which clues to follow in the case of her aunt’s mysterious death. Seeing her struggle in this area made her feel relatable to me. She seemed like a perfectly ordinary person in the very best sense of that phrase.

One of the most interesting parts of the storyline had to do with Myrtle’s family tree. She was adopted by Aunt Eve as a young child. Luckily, her aunt had a great deal of information about where their ancestors came from and what sort of folks they were. It was fascinating to get to know their family better. While I sure did wonder why Myrtle wasn’t taught many of these things early in life due to her aunt’s obvious attraction to the subject, I’m hoping that any sequels will dive into this topic on a deeper level. There was definitely a lot of space left to explore here.

This book had a large cast of characters that Ms. Hansen did a fantastic job of keeping organized for the audience. While I did take notes of who everyone was and how they were connected to each other, the storyline itself provided prompts about this when necessary as well. I always knew who everyone was, and that’s important when there are a lot of characters running around whose relationships with one another are crucial in order to understand what’s going on.

Anyone who enjoys genealogy or history should check out In My Attic.